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Internet resources relating to phocomelia (Ectromelia). Gross hypo- or aplasia of one or more long bones of one or more limbs. The concept includes amelia, hemimelia, and phocomelia. MeSH Search Term "Ectromelia"[mesh] [OCOSH Code: D004480_HD_CHD_FP_PM]

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Asymmetrical tetraphocomelia with radiohumeral synostosis

Location: http://www.saudiannals.net/temp/AnnSaudiMed264318-6016349_164243.pdf

Case report with clinical photographs Ann Saudi Med. 2006 Jul-Aug;26(4):318-20. Asymmetrical tetraphocomelia with radiohumeral synostosis. Shonubi AM, Akiode O, Salami BA, Musa AA, Sotimehin SA, Sule GA.
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Multidisciplinary Surgical Approach to a Surviving Infant With Sirenomelia

Location: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/118/1/e220

Sirenomelia is an extremely complex and rare malformation with different degrees of lower-extremities fusion associated with gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, vascular, cardiopulmonary, and central nervous system malformations. In the English literature, there are only 5 reports of infants surviving with this condition. In our case, a 2540-g female infant was born with...
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Phocomelia Syndrome OMIM

Location: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/dispomim.cgi?id=269000

Herrmann et al. (1969) described a syndrome consisting of the following features: (1) nearly symmetrical reductive malformations of the limbs, resembling phocomelia; (2) flexion contractures of various joints; (3) multiple minor anomalies, including capillary hemangioma of the face, forehead and ears, hypoplastic cartilages of the ears and nose, micrognathia, scanty,...
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The Management of Lower Limb Phocomelia JBJS B

Location: http://www.jbjs.org.uk/cgi/reprint/52-B/4/688

The management of children with bilateral phocomelia is very difficult. In these patients the whole or greater portion of the femur is absent, as is usually also the tibia. Conventional prostheses have, at the best, given laboured, restricted and unstable walking. The problem is made worse by the fact that many of these...
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