Orthopedics > OCOSH Classification > Bone Diseases > Infectious Bone Diseases

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Bone diseases caused by pathogenic microorganisms.
[OCOSH Code: D001850 111253001 M86 BD_IBD]

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Osteoarticular Tuberculosis (11)
Infection of the bones or joint due to tuberculosis, infection with mycoplasma sp.
MeSH Search Term "Tuberculosis, Osteoarticular"[mesh]
ICD-10 Code A18.0+ Tuberculosis of bones and joints
SNOMED-CT term Tuberculosis of bones AND/OR joints (disorder) Concept ID: 17653001
OCOSH Code: D014394 17653001 A18.0+ BD_IBD_OTB
Osteomyelitis (33)
Acute and chronic bone infections due to bacteria.
MeSH Search Term "Osteomyelitis"[mesh]
ICD-10 Code M86 Osteomyelitis
SNOMED-CT Term Osteomyelitis (disorder) Concept ID: 60168000
Synonyms - Osteomyelitis
Pyogenic inflammation of bone
OSTM - Osteomyelitis
OM - Osteomyelitis
Osteomyelitis (disorder)
OCOSH Code: D010019 60168000 M86 BD_IBD_OM

Resources

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Acetinobacter eMedicine Infectious Diseases

Location: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/236891-overview

Acinetobacter baumannii is a pleomorphic aerobic gram-negative bacillus (similar in appearance to Haemophilus influenzae on Gram stain) commonly isolated from the hospital environment and hospitalized patients. A baumannii is a water organism and preferentially colonizes aquatic environments. This organism is often cultured from hospitalized patients' sputum or respiratory secretions, wounds,...
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View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark It Added: Mon May 18 2009

Antimicrobial therapy for diabetic foot infections

Location: http://www.postgradmed.com/issues/1999/07_99/shea.htm

Antimicrobial therapy for diabetic foot infections A practical approach Kevin W. Shea, MD VOL 106 / NO 1 / JULY 1999 / POSTGRADUATE MEDICINE CME learning objectives To identify factors that influence antibiotic selection in the treatment of diabetic foot infections To understand the microbiology of the infected diabetic foot To establish an effective...
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View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark It Added: Sun May 07 2006

Bone Joint And Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections

Location: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=mmed.chapter.5381

Medical Microbiology Section 5. Introduction to Infectious Diseases 100. Bone, Joint, and Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections Jon T. Mader Jason Calhoun General Concepts Sections include:- Introduction Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections Crepitant Anaerobic Cellulitis Necrotizing Fasciitis Nonclostridial Myonecrosis Clostridial Myonecrosis Fungal Necrotizing Cellulitis Joint...
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View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark It Added: Sun Apr 02 2006

Catscratch Disease eMedicine Infectious Diseases

Location: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/214100-overview

Catscratch disease (CSD) is a bacterial infection caused by Bartonella henselae, a gram-negative rod. It is associated with a self-limited subacute solitary or regional lymphadenopathy. Patients with catscratch disease usually have a history of sustaining a scratch or bite from a cat or kitten.
Nervi et al 2009
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View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark It Added: Mon May 18 2009

Clostrdial Gas Gangrene eMedicine Infectious Diseases

Location: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/214992-overview

Clostridial gas gangrene is a highly lethal necrotizing soft tissue infection of skeletal muscle caused by toxin- and gas-producing Clostridium species. The synonym clostridial myonecrosis better describes both the causative agent and the target tissue. Prior to the advent of antibiotics and mobile army surgical hospitals, as many as 5%...
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Corynebacterium Infections eMedicine Infectious Diseases

Location: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/215100-overview

Today, the more common scenario is nondiphtherial corynebacterial bacteremia associated with device infections (venous access catheters, heart valves, neurosurgical shunts, peritoneal catheters), as well as meningitis, septic arthritis, and urinary tract infections.
Lynda A Frassetto, MD 2008
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View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark It Added: Mon May 18 2009

Diabetic Foot Infections eMedicine Infectious Diseases

Location: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/237378-overview

The spectrum of foot infections in diabetes ranges from simple superficial cellulitis to chronic osteomyelitis. Infections in patients with diabetes are difficult to treat because these patients have impaired microvascular circulation, which limits the access of phagocytic cells to the infected area and results in a poor concentration of antibiotics...
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View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark It Added: Mon May 18 2009

Enterobacter Infections eMedicine Infectious Diseases

Location: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/216845-overview

Enterobacter species, particularly Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter aerogenes, are important nosocomial pathogens responsible for various infections, including bacteremia, lower respiratory tract infections, skin and soft-tissue infections, urinary tract infections (UTIs), endocarditis, intra-abdominal infections, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and ophthalmic infections. Enterobacter species can also cause various community-acquired infections, including UTIs, skin...
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View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark It Added: Mon May 18 2009

Enterococcal Infections eMedicine Infectious Diseases

Location: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/216993-overview

Enterococci are part of the normal intestinal flora of humans and animals but are also important pathogens responsible for serious infections. The genus Enterococcus includes more than 17 species, but only a few cause clinical infections in humans. With increasing antibiotic resistance, enterococci are recognized as feared nosocomial pathogens that...
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Escherichia Coli Infections eMedicine Infectious Diseases

Location: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/217485-overview

Escherichia coli is one of the most frequent causes of many common bacterial infections, including cholecystitis, bacteremia, cholangitis, urinary tract infection (UTI), and traveler's diarrhea, and other clinical infections such as neonatal meningitis and pneumonia.
Tarun Madappa, MD, MPH & Chi Hiong U Go, MD 2008
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View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark It Added: Mon May 18 2009

Foot Infections eMedicine Orthopedics

Location: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1237208-overview

Foot infections can be difficult problems for physicians to treat due to the biomechanical complexities of the extremity and the underlying circumstances that cause the infections. Typically, they follow a traumatic event or tissue loss with contamination by foreign materials and/or colonization by bacteria. When a healthy patient or one...
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View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark It Added: Thu Mar 20 2008

Gas Gangrene eMedicine Infectious Diseases

Location: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/217943-overview

Gas gangrene and clostridial myonecrosis are interchangeable terms used to describe an infection of muscle tissue by toxin-producing clostridia. In 1861, Louis Pasteur identified the first clostridial species, Clostridium butyricum. In 1892 and later, Welch, Nuttall, and other scientists isolated a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus from gangrenous wounds. This organism, originally...
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View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark It Added: Mon May 18 2009

Haemophilus Influenzae Infections eMedicine Infectious Diseases

Location: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/218271-overview

The most virulent strain is H influenzae type b (Hib), with its polyribosyl ribitol phosphate (PRP) capsule. It accounts for more than 95% of H influenzae invasive diseases in children and half of invasive diseases in adults, including bacteremia, meningitis, cellulitis, epiglottitis, septic arthritis, pneumonia, and empyema. Less-common invasive Hib...
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View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark It Added: Mon May 18 2009

Hand Infections eMedicine Emergency

Location: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/783011-overview

In 1939, Kanavel, author of the landmark Infections of the Hand, observed, "In almost all cases of serious infection the difficulty is to make a correct diagnosis both as to the nature of the infection and the position of the pus." Specific infections covered in this article include paronychia, felon,...
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View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark It Added: Thu Apr 03 2008

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