Orthopedics > OCOSH Classification > Foot Deformities > Equinus Deformity > 1995 Preserving Plantar Flexion Strength After Surgical Treatment for Contracture of the Triceps Surae

Next >

1995 Preserving Plantar Flexion Strength After Surgical Treatment for Contracture of the Triceps Surae

Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark It

Location: http://www.musculographics.com/pdf/1995_plantar.pdf

Description: Summary: Contractures of the triceps surae commonly are treated by surgical lengthening of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis or the Achilles tendon. Although these procedures generally relieve contractures, patients sometimes are left with dramatically decreased plantar flexion strength (i.e., decreased capacity to generate plantar flexion moment). The purpose of this study was to examine the trade-off between restoring range of motion and maintaining plantar flexion strength after surgical treatment for contracture of the triceps surae. A computer model representing the normal moment-generating characteristics of the triceps surae was altered to represent two conditions: isolated contracture of the gastrocnemius and contracture of both the gastrocnemius and the soleus. The effects of lengthening the gastrocnemius aponeurosis and the Achilles tendon were simulated for each condition. The simulations showed that nearly normal moment-generating charac- teristics could be restored when isolated gastrocnemius contracture was treated with lengthening of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis. However, when isolated gastrocnemius contracture was treated with lengthening of the Achilles tendon, the moment-generating capacity of the plantar flexors decreased greatly. This suggests that lengthening of the Achilles tendon should be avoided in persons with isolated gastrocnemius contracture. Our simulations also suggest that neither lengthening of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis nor lengthening of the Achilles tendon by itself is an effective treatment for combined contracture of the gastrocnemius and soleus. Lengthening the gastrocnemius aponeuro- sis did not decrease the excessive passive moment developed by the contracted soleus. Lengthening the Achilles tendon restored the normal passive range of motion but sub- stantially decreased the active force-gen era ting capacity of the muscles. Our simulations indicate that independent lengthening of the contracted gastrocnemius and soleus, rather than lengthening of their common tendon, accounts for differences in the architecture of these muscles and may be a more effective means to restore range of motion and maintain plantar flexion strength when combined contracture of the gastrocnemius and soleus is present
Preserving Plantar Flexion Strength After Surgical Treatment for Contracture of the Triceps Surae: A Computer Simulation Study Scott L. Delp, Kimberly Statler, and *Norris C. Carroll Journal of Orthopaedic Research Vol 1 # 1 pp96-104 1995

Type: Reference Material
Author/Contact: Delp et al
Institution: J Orthop Res
Primary Subject/Category:

Language: English

Submitted by: admin
Hits: 1010
Added: Fri Nov 13 2009
Last Modified: Mon May 16 2011